Open Source is the Surest and Shortest Path to Digital Transformation

Back in 2013, Mike Olson, a co-founder of Cloudera, famously stated that “No dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last 10 years in closed-source, proprietary form.”.  He’s absolutely right about that.  John Newton underscored this theme at a recent Alfresco Day event in NYC.  He shared this slide as a part of his presentation, which I think does a great job showing how much of our modern platforms are dependent on the open source ecosystem:

open-components-slide

Platforms are more open today than they have ever been, with a few exceptions (I’m glaring annoyed at my iPhone as I write this).  Quite a few companies seem to have figured out the secret sauce of blending open platforms with proprietary value-adds to create robust, open ecosystems AND be able to pay the bills in the process.  This is very good news for you if you are pursuing a digital transformation strategy.

Why open source and open standards?

The advantages of open source are pretty well established at this point.  Open projects are more developer friendly.  They innovate faster.  They can fork and merge and rapidly change direction if the community needs that to happen (although there are good and bad forks).  Open has become the de-facto way that the digital business works today.  I’d challenge you to find any team within your organization that isn’t using at least one open source project or library.  Open has won.  That’s the first big advantage of open source in digital transformation today:  It’s ubiquitous.  You can find a platform or component to fill just about any need you have.

Open is also faster to try, and removes a lot of friction when testing out a new idea.  Effective digital transformation relies on speed and agility.  It’s a huge advantage to simply pull down a build of an open source technology you want to try out, stand it up and get to work.  That allows bad ideas to fail fast, and good ideas to flourish immediately.  Since testing ideas out is effectively free in terms of dollar cost, and cheap in terms of time and cognitive investment, I think we also tend to be more willing to throw it out and start over if we don’t get the results we want.  That’s a good thing as it ultimately leads to less time spent trying to find a bigger hammer to slam that square peg into a round hole.  If you decide to go forward with a particular technology, You’ll find commercial organizations standing behind them with support and value added components that can take an open source core to the next level.

If digital transformation relies on speed of innovation, then open technologies look even more appealing.  Why do open source projects tend to out-innovate their purely proprietary competitors?  There are probably a lot of reasons.  An open project isn’t limited to contributors from only one company.  Great ideas can come from anywhere and often do.  At their best, large open source projects function as meritocracies.  This is especially true of foundational platform technologies that may have originated at or get contributions from tech leaders.  These are the same technologies that can power your own digital transformation.

Open source projects also make the pace of innovation easier to manage since you get full transparency of what has changed version to version, and the visibility into the future direction of the project.  Looking at pending pull requests or commits between releases gives you a view into what is evolving in the project so that you can plan accordingly.  In a very real sense, pursuing a digital transformation strategy using open technologies forces you to adopt a modular, swappable, services driven approach.  Replacing a monolithic application stack every cycle is not possible, but replacing or upgrading individual service components in a larger architecture is, and open source makes that easier.

Software eats the world, and is a voracious cannibal

There is a downside to this pace of change, however.  Because open source projects innovate so quickly, and because the bar to creating one is so low, we often see exciting projects disrupted before they can really deliver on their promise.  Just when the people responsible for architecture and strategy start to fully understand how to exploit a new technology, the hype cycle begins on something that will supersede it.  Nowhere is this as bad as it is in the world of JavaScript frameworks where every week something new  and shiny and loud is vying for developers’ limited time and attention.  Big data suffers from the same problem.  A few years ago I would have lumped NoSQL (I hate that term, but it has stuck) databases into that category as well, but the sector seems to have settled down a little bit.

There is also a risk that an open source technology will lose its way, lose its user and developer base and become abandonware.  Look for those projects that have staying power.  Broad user adoption, frequent commits and active discussions are all good signs.  Projects that are part of a well established organization like the Apache Software Foundation are also usually a good bet.  Apache has a rigorous process that a project must follow to become a full blown project, and this drives a level of discipline that independent projects may lack.  A healthy company standing behind the project is another good sign, as that means there are people out there with financial interest in the project’s success.

Simply using open source projects to build your platform for transformation is no guarantee of success, but I would argue that carefully selecting the right open components does tilt the odds in your favor.

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